Episode 16: Challenging assumptions in global health research

We don’t just dive into a country with predetermined solutions. We sit and talk to people about what the issues are.

Gael O’Sullivan joins the podcast to discuss the challenges that come with confronting assumptions related to global health issues and the benefits of adopting a mixed-method research approach for behavior change.

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Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode on Twitter any time using #ReQPod16.  Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Our name for both accounts is @ReQPod.

About Gael O’Sullivan

Gael O’Sullivan, MBA, has over 25 years of experience applying health communication and social and commercial marketing skills to projects addressing pandemic threats in addition to projects focused on family planning, reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, tobacco control and prevention, chronic disease prevention, and child health in the United States and worldwide. As Abt Associates’ Senior Social and Behavior Change (SBC) Technical Advisor, she leads the SBC technical segment for Abt’s International Health Division. Ms. O’Sullivan has led large, multi-year USAID health communication projects and research activities with decentralized teams across three continents, including Africa. To boost local SBC capacity, Ms. O’Sullivan led a team of Abt staff to create a two-day introductory workshop on SBC; subsequently the team adapted the course into an innovative eLearning product. Ms. O’Sullivan is

Ms. O’Sullivan is lead technical advisor to Abt’s $30 million USAID-funded cooperative agreement to increase demand for family planning and reproductive health services in Jordan. She also led the development of national communication strategies to prevent and mitigate HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe, Benin and Bhutan, and contributed to national communication strategies on safe drinking water, hygiene and sanitation in Pakistan, and malaria in Zimbabwe.  Ms. O’Sullivan has worked extensively in Albania, Armenia, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bhutan, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, India, Jordan, Kenya, Laos, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Morocco, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Vietnam. She has an MBA from George Washington University, a B.S. degree in French from Georgetown University, and has lived in Togo and Switzerland.

 

 

 

Episode 14: Building Capacity for Conservation

Ultimately, if we think about the people we’re working with, they know their context best. They know the ultimate outcomes and goals they want to see in their communities.

Alexandra Jabs, Training Director at Rare, and Claudia Quintanilla, Traning Director at Rare Brazil, join the podcast to discuss Rare’s approach to conservation through community partnership and capacity building. Through this model, Rare is able to create highly localized solutions to global conservation issues.

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Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter anytime using #ReQPod14. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

About Alexandra Jabs 

Alexandra Jabs is an international education specialist with more than 10 years of experience in capacity building, training design and delivery, and youth development. As Training Director at Rare, she is responsible for setting the vision, goals, and priorities for training strategies and products, including approaches for scale, eLearning, country customization, and evaluation. In addition, Alex leads a global team of training professionals that is responsible for setting training standards, improving training approaches, and fostering learning around program implementation. In previous work experience, she developed innovative ways to communicate complex data to policymakers, with a particular focus on improving investments in young people’s sexual and reproductive health. Alex also spent several months in Bangladesh implementing a qualitative research study to document lessons learned from a national HIV/AIDS prevention program for young people. When she is not working, she enjoys jamming on her violin and guitar, as well as spending quality time with her husband and 6-month old daughter.

ajabs@rare.org

About Claudia Quintanilla

Claudia is passionate about contributing to community and environmental well-being.  She started at Rare as the Regional Trainer Director for the Latin America office, coordinating the customization, execution and evaluation of the Pride curriculum for the fisheries management, reciprocal water agreements and alumni programs implementing projects in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru.  Currently, she is the Training Director of Rare Brazil where, in collaboration with national and local partners, the team is adapting and applying a fisheries rights-based management approach in six extractive marine reserves along the Brazilian coastline.  Prior to joining Rare, she was Peace Corps Mexico’s Technical Trainer for the Technology Transference and Environmental Programs and Peace Corps Honduras’ Programming & Training Specialist for the Protected Areas Management Program. Before that, she worked with the European Union and ChildFund on consultant projects in environmental education and risk management with public school teachers, communities and municipal leaders in Central America; taught an undergraduate Ecology class for nearly five years and conducted numerous qualitative environmental assessments. Claudia holds Environmental Engineering and Management degrees.

CQuintanilla@rare.org

 

Episode 12: Planning for Climate Change

What does our future look like? We can’t plan for the past anymore, we have to plan for our future climate.

Dr. Danya Rumore joins the podcast to discuss how she and other planners are helping communities take action in response to our changing climate.

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Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter anytime using #ReQPod12. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

About Dr. Danya Rumore

Danya Rumore, Ph.D., joined the University of Utah in July as the Associate Director of the Environmental Dispute Resolution Program in the Wallace Stegner Center at the S.J. Quinney College of Law. The EDR Program promotes collaboration, mediation, and other alternative dispute resolution processes as a means to address environmental conflicts throughout the mountain west. Danya is also a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of City and Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah. She teaches courses in negotiation and dispute resolution and is a research affiliate of the University’s Ecological Planning Center and Global Change and Sustainability Center. Danya completed her doctorate in Environmental Policy and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology this summer. While at MIT, she was the Assistant Director of the MIT Science Impact Collaborative and the Project Manager for the New England Climate Adaptation Project. Danya’s work and research focus on supporting more collaborative decision-making and stakeholder engagement in the context of science-intensive environmental issues, with a particular focus on climate-related risk management, water resource management, and mixed land-use planning. She holds a Master of Science in Environmental Management and Geography from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science and Natural Resource Economics from Oregon State University. Danya has worked with a range of organizations, including the Consensus Building Institute, the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School, the New Zealand Centre for Sustainable Cities, and the Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences. She is a co-author of the new book Managing Climate Risks in Coastal Communities: Strategies for Engagement, Readiness, and Adaptation, which is now available for pre-order on Amazon.

Twitter: @DanyaRumore

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Episode 11: Social marketing and behavior change in conservation

Marketing is both a powerful and positive tool for shaping our perceptions, actions, and social norms. I encourage anyone who’s working in any cause-based mission to embrace social marketing as an important tool, especially those working in conservation.

Brooke Sadowsky and Kevin Green from Rare join the podcast to discuss how working in conservation informs their social marketing and behavior change approach.

Listen now.

 

Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter any time using #ReQPod11. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

About Brooke Sadowsky

Brooke Sadowsky spent nearly a decade working in commercial advertising, helping clients such as British Airways, Pfizer, and American Express reach key consumer audiences in an effort to build brand awareness, change preferences, and sell products. Desiring to have her work match her personal passion for wildlife conservation, Brooke joined Rare in 2007 – an organization that specializes in using commercial marketing techniques to inspire local communities to better protect and preserve their natural resources. During her time at Rare, Brooke has partnered with local NGOs and Local Government Units to develop and implement social marketing campaigns in Mongolia, Thailand, Lao PDR, Bahamas, Madagascar, Guam, and in the Philippines targeting a variety of human-induced threats to species conservation. Brooke now serves as Rare’s global lead on evolving and applying social marketing methodology for Rare’s two global initiatives in rights-based fisheries management and in improved agriculture for forest protection and water quality in freshwater ecosystems.

Contact Brooke at: brookesadowsky@gmail.com

About Kevin Green

Kevin is interested in how and why humans cooperate to achieve common goals. As Senior Manager, Behavioral & Social Science at Rare, he collaborates with field staff and partners across Latin America and Asia in using social research methods and tools in the field, designing strategic social marketing campaigns, and driving on-the-ground application of the constantly growing body of research in the behavioral sciences about how human beings are motivated. He previously led the development of Rare’s social impact monitoring framework and co-authored the Principles of Pride, a guide to the fundamental principles of Rare’s ‘Pride’ social marketing methodology. Kevin has researched payments for environmental services  and other incentive mechanisms for conservation and development, and is a faculty member of the Kinship Conservation Fellows program and a former fellow of the Emerging Wildlife Conservation Leaders (EWCL) program. Before Rare, Kevin was a research fellow at the Nature Conservancy and a research assistant at the Worldwatch Institute. He holds an MA in international development and economics from Johns Hopkins University and a BA in anthropology and sociology from Washington and Lee University.

Contact Kevin at: kgreen@rare.org

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

 

 

Episodes 7&8: Research for Planning and Evaluation in Social Marketing

Episode 7

If you want to watch a lion hunt, don’t go to the zoo. Go to the jungle.

Craig Lefebvre, PhD, joins the podcast for a two-part series on research in social marketing. In this first episode we discuss theories, concepts, and strategies for conducting quality research for campaign and program planning.

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Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter any time using #ReQPod7. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

Episode #8

Understanding the perspective of the people you’re serving should be the most important benchmark for how you conduct your research and evaluation activities.

Craig Lefebvre, PhD, Craig Lefebvre, PhD, re-joins the podcast for the second episode of a two-part series on research in social marketing. In this episode we discuss theories, concepts, and strategies for conducting quality evaluation.
Listen now.

Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter any time using #ReQPod8. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

About Craig Lefebvre, PhD
Craig Lefebvre, PhD is an architect and designer of public health and social change programs. He is the chief maven at socialShift, the social design, marketing and media consultancy located in Sarasota, FL. He is also Lead Change Designer at RTI International and Research Professor at the Florida Prevention Research Center at the University of South Florida College of Public Health.

Craig has been involved in several hundred social marketing programs at the community, state and national levels in the US and across the world. In addition to an active practice side, Craig is the author of over 125 publications in the areas of community health promotion, social marketing, social and mobile media and public health and has made more than 300 presentations at professional meetings and invited venues around the world. His recent books include Social marketing and social change: Strategies and tools for improving health, well-being and the environment [San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2013] and a six-volume series on Social Marketing for the SAGE Library in Marketing [London: Sage Publications, 2013]. He also produces the blog On Social Marketing and Social Change.

He is a founding Board Member of the International Social Marketing Association, a Senior Fellow in the Society for New Communications Research and he is a recipient of the William D. Novelli Award for Innovations in Social Marketing and most recently the Phillip Kotler Social Marketing Distinguished Service Award.

Resources related to the episodes:

Episode 6: Can culture change the environment? Energy use and the military

We wanted people to understand that for the military, energy is not about being green… it’s about the mission.

Darrin Kayser of Booz Allen Hamilton joins the podcast to discuss his work to reduce military energy use and how culture change strategies provided the key to doing so.

Listen now.

Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter any time using #ReQPod6. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

About Darrin Kayser

Darrin is a Lead Associate with Booz Allen Hamilton, has nineteen years of experience providing strategic communications support to elected officials and senior U.S. government leaders.  An expert in the design and execution of energy behavior change for the military, Mr. Kayser has provided strategic communications support to eleven energy-related Department of Defense offices. His behavior change work has earned government awards like the Air Force’s Soaring Eagle Award and industry awards like the Public Relations Society of America’s Silver Anvil.  He was a speaker at the 2015 World Social Marketing Conference and will be speaking at the Behavior in Energy and Climate Change Conference in October.  Prior to his work at Booz Allen, Darrin was a Spokesperson and Manager of Strategic Initiatives for the Transportation Security Administration and a Press Secretary for a member of the U.S. Congress.  He received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in communications related fields from The George Washington University.

Resources mentioned in this episode:

  •  Air Force Energy Facebook page 
  • Marine Corps’ “You Have the Power” campaign
  • Navy’s “Energy Warrior” campaign

Episode 5: The Embrace Life Campaign

Behaviors around seatbelt use had been advertised for some 30 years, but people were still dying and being injured from non-use of seatbelts…Something was missing. Something needed to change.

Neil Hopkins, previously of the Sussex Safer Roads Partnership, joins the podcast to discuss the viral Embrace Life campaign and its legacy since being released over five years ago.

Listen now.

Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter any time using #ReQPod5. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

About Neil Hopkins

Aged 33, Neil’s work history is a little unusual. At 14, he sold his first article to a UK high street magazine. At 18, he was working for an editorial agency, writing marketing pieces for a national readership of around 3.5million people. In his early 20s, he worked in call centres – managing high pressure teams, training new recruits and establishing a new satellite centre. He then entered Local Government in 2004, moving between authorities before re-emerging into a small private sector consultancy focusing on economic regeneration and business development in 2006.

As the global recession bit in 2008, he moved back into local government, this time working to reduce deaths and injuries on the roads through a small organisation called the Sussex Safer Roads Partnership – from where, less than a year later, Embrace Life emerged.

After five behaviour-focused years at the Partnership, Neil has moved into another Local Government Authority to lead the development of their communications function in a rapidly changing social and political environment.

Find him on:

Twitter (@interacter)

LinkedIn

Google+

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Additional resources:

 

Episode 4: Mentorship and the academic track in social marketing

We are a community of social marketers. I think it’s important to remember that we need to support each other in the work that we do and offer that support in a number of ways. One way is through mentorship, another way is by collaborating with each other.

Dr. Nadia Zainuudin from the University of Wollongong joins the podcast to discuss mentorship and the academic path in social marketing.

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Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter any time using #ReQPod4. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

About Dr. Nadia Zainuddin

Nadia Zainuddin is a Researcher and Lecturer in Marketing at the Faculty of Business, University of Wollongong. She is a specialist in the area of value creation, particularly in the fields of health, wellness, and wellbeing. Nadia also works in related research areas such as Transformative Service Research, technology and its use in service and social change, and branding in social marketing. She is an Editorial Advisory Board member for the Journal of Services Marketing, Guest Editor of the World Social Marketing Special Issue for the Journal of Social Marketing, and Co-Chair of the upcoming International Social Marketing Conference 2016.

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Episode 3: Rhetoric is not a dirty word

Rhetoric is how we use symbols, whether images or language, to make sense of the world around us and communicate our particular perspectives to each other.

Teacher, scholar, and writer Dr. Christine Seifert joins the podcast to discuss rhetoric, how it both reflects and reinforces culture, and how rhetorical analysis can benefit social marketers and communication professionals.

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Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter any time using #ReQPod3. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

About Dr. Christine Seifert

Christine Seifert is an Associate Professor of Communication at Westminster College where she is the Director of the Master of Strategic Communication Program. She has a PhD in English with specializations in rhetoric and professional writing. In addition to teaching graduate and undergraduate classes, she does corporate training and consulting on persuasion, change management, and project management. Christine is the author of three books: The Predicteds, a YA novel (2011); Virginity in Young Adult Literature after Twilight, an analysis of sex and virginity in YA literature published in the last 5 years (2015); and Whoppers: History’s Most Outrageous Lies and Liars, a YA nonfiction book about lying (due out in September 2015). Christine also publishes articles regularly in Bitch magazine and in other publications, including the Journal of Business Communication and Inside Higher Ed. Her articles have been republished in multiple readers and textbooks. She is scared of bees and avalanches.

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Episode 2: What is social marketing anyway?

When done well, social marketing programs really can be effective in creating large-scale change.

Nedra Weinreich of Weinreich Communications joins the podcast to provide an introduction to social marketing and to illustrate how social marketing campaigns manifest in the real world.

Listen now.

Don’t let the conversation end here. Discuss this episode in the comments section below or on Twitter any time using #ReQPod2. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Our name for all accounts is @ReQPod.

About Nedra Weinreich

Ever since Nedra heard about this thing called “social marketing” a quarter century ago, her mission has been to help as many organizations as possible put it into action. And she’s done just that through Weinreich Communications, which she founded in 1995; through her book Hands-On Social Marketing: A Step-By-Step Guide to Designing Change for Good; and with the trainings she’s conducted via Social Marketing University® and other events, through which she has trained thousands of professionals. For years, she’s been the CDC’s conference go-to gal for social media training. She also instills her passion for social marketing into the next generation, teaching a graduate course at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health for many years.

As if that weren’t enough social marketing in her life, she is also on the board of directors of the International Social Marketing Association and on the editorial board of the Social Marketing Quarterly. Nedra earned her Master’s degree in Health and Social Behavior from the Harvard School of Public Health and her Bachelor’s degree in Conservation and Resource Studies from the University of California at Berkeley.

You can follow her on Twitter at @Nedra and visit her website at social-marketing.com.

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Elevating the voices of those in marketing and business who want to change the world.